Archive for 'Physicians/specialists'

Local lupus study recruiting participants

SLE is an autoimmune disease capable of causing severe tissue damage in many organs. The cause of SLE is unknown, but recent research has identified infection-fighting proteins called interferons (or IFNs) which are made and released by host cells in response to the presence of pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, parasites or tumor cells. IFNs allow for communication between cells to trigger the protective defenses of the immune system that eradicate pathogens or tumors.

In this ...

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lupus_admin
1

Genes are “Interferin’ with lupus family business

It is common knowledge that lupus runs in families. In fact, primary relatives (siblings, parents, children) of a person with the condition have a three- to five-fold increased risk of developing the disease compared with the average person on the street. But until just the last decade, we haven’t known how increased risk of lupus could be inherited.

Figuring out how lupus runs in families has been complicated. Lupus is not like some genetic diseases carrying a high profile in the ...

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epeterson
0

“Colonel Mustard did it with the candlestick in the library.”

“Colonel Mustard did it with the candlestick in the library.”

One hears statements of this kind while playing the popular board game “Clue.” Players of Clue must travel around an imaginary old mansion while collecting hints. Based on hints, players make educated guesses about the “where, who, and with what weapon” facts of a murder mystery.

Pursuing better treatments and cures for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a little like playing an exceedingly complicated game of Clue. Villainous SLE ...

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epeterson
2

Come hell or high water

“I recommend that you take the medication each day, come hell or high water.”

I sometimes use this cliché’ phrase as I counsel patients suffering with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Clinical research shows that diligence and persistence in use of immune system-modulating drugs is important for optimal disease control for many people with SLE. Some drugs need to be taken day in and day out, for months or years, to be most effective. Repeated clinic visits, blood monitoring requirements, pharmacy charges, ...

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epeterson
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Dr. Emily Gillespie Visits with MinnPost for Lupus Q&A



Dr. Emily Gillespie, University of Minnesota researcher who will present at the Lupus Foundation of Minnesota’s Lupus Conference on December 15, recently sat down with MinnPost contributor Susan Perry to discuss lupus and its complications, current research and even mortality.  The Q & A-formatted interview can be viewed on the MinnPost website: Continue Reading →


lupus_admin
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Gaffney is Rewriting the “User’s Manual”

With the completion of the Human Genome Project. Scientists promised the world a sort of “user’s manual” for the human body and commentators predicted the end of disease.
 
While those results have not yet arrived, it’s researchers like the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation’s Patrick Gaffney, M.D., who are trying to get the world there.
 
If DNA is the “Big Book of You,” with billions of pages ...

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pgaffney
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A new drug is approved, new questions arise. So how do we find the answers?

Fortunately, many researchers have ideas about where to look for answers, because we know that Benlysta works by reining in a type of immune cells called B cells.  B cells play an important role in the normal immune response, but when inappropriately activated in a lupus patient, they produce harmful elements that cause the damaging effects seen in SLE.  Researchers think that measuring these may provide clues to help us determine whether an individual patient is likely to respond to ...

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egillespie
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A new drug is approved. What’s next?

We finally get to ask that question about lupus, after the FDA approved Benlysta, the first new drug approved for SLE in over 50 years, in March 2011. 

Patients and researchers alike are asking questions …  Who needs to take this drug?  How is it different from the medicines that doctors were already using?  How do we know it’s going to work? How do we know that it’s going to work better than those other medications?

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egillespie
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Lifetime Risk of Adult-Onset Autoimmune Diseases

There is a recent (within the past year) article from Mayo Clinic that I’ve attached here, that I think addresses some questions about the incidence of lupus in Minnesota.  It is focused on the overall lifetime risk for development of autoimmune diseases, including SLE.

“The Lifetime Risk of Adult-Onset Rheumatoid Arthritis and Other Inflammatory Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases”

Article published in:
Arthritis & Rheumatism
Vol. 63, No. 3
March 2011

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egillespie
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