Posts Tagged 'University of Minnesota'

From bed to bench and from bench to bed

The Lupus Foundation of Minnesota Fellowship was (no exaggeration) the most productive, meaningful, and inspirational experience I could have imagined my summer to be. Not only did I gain research experience and scientific communication skills, but I met peers, mentors, and patients who impacted my perspective on clinical and translational research.

Having the opportunity to interact with patients during my fellowship (with the courtesy of my PI, Dr. Erik Peterson) significantly and positively affected my fellowship experience. I am ...

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ayamamoto
ayamamoto
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Local lupus study recruiting participants

SLE is an autoimmune disease capable of causing severe tissue damage in many organs. The cause of SLE is unknown, but recent research has identified infection-fighting proteins called interferons (or IFNs) which are made and released by host cells in response to the presence of pathogens such as viruses, bacteria, parasites or tumor cells. IFNs allow for communication between cells to trigger the protective defenses of the immune system that eradicate pathogens or tumors.

In this ...

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lupus_admin
1

Genes are “Interferin’ with lupus family business

It is common knowledge that lupus runs in families. In fact, primary relatives (siblings, parents, children) of a person with the condition have a three- to five-fold increased risk of developing the disease compared with the average person on the street. But until just the last decade, we haven’t known how increased risk of lupus could be inherited.

Figuring out how lupus runs in families has been complicated. Lupus is not like some genetic diseases carrying a high profile in the ...

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epeterson
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“Colonel Mustard did it with the candlestick in the library.”

“Colonel Mustard did it with the candlestick in the library.”

One hears statements of this kind while playing the popular board game “Clue.” Players of Clue must travel around an imaginary old mansion while collecting hints. Based on hints, players make educated guesses about the “where, who, and with what weapon” facts of a murder mystery.

Pursuing better treatments and cures for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a little like playing an exceedingly complicated game of Clue. Villainous SLE ...

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epeterson
2

Come hell or high water

“I recommend that you take the medication each day, come hell or high water.”

I sometimes use this cliché’ phrase as I counsel patients suffering with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). Clinical research shows that diligence and persistence in use of immune system-modulating drugs is important for optimal disease control for many people with SLE. Some drugs need to be taken day in and day out, for months or years, to be most effective. Repeated clinic visits, blood monitoring requirements, pharmacy charges, ...

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epeterson
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Dr. Emily Gillespie Visits with MinnPost for Lupus Q&A



Dr. Emily Gillespie, University of Minnesota researcher who will present at the Lupus Foundation of Minnesota’s Lupus Conference on December 15, recently sat down with MinnPost contributor Susan Perry to discuss lupus and its complications, current research and even mortality.  The Q & A-formatted interview can be viewed on the MinnPost website: Continue Reading →


lupus_admin
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A summer of opportunities

This summer was amazing! I can’t even begin to describe how beneficial this summer fellowship was to my future career as a scientist. I learned so many new protocols that I can add to my list, as well as just how a lab works in general. I always thought labs had an impersonal and competitive environment, but this summer I got to see just how collaborative everyone was within and between labs.

I also got to do some amazing things that ...

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blauer
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The buzz of science

Successful science is not done only from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Nor does it restrict itself to the working week. Working at the Center for Immunology has thrown me into the pace of science: a well-oiled machine that takes over your existence no matter which day of the week or what time of day.

The greatest excitement while doing my experiments has come as the sun is setting, as the lab quietens down from the hustle and bustle of the daytime. Still, ...

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pmiozzo
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What my project is all about

This week I thought I’d talk more about what my specific project is and what I hope to gain from it. It was nice because when I first heard about this project, I was able to understand all the concepts being discussed because of classes I’ve taken here at the University of Minnesota! My project deals with alternative splicing factors in a signaling molecule known as Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF). Usually VEGF has been associated with pro-angiogenic properties, which ...

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blauer
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Collaboration leads to solutions

This week I really got to dig into my individual summer project! It’s a joint project with Dr. Jerry Molitor who is focused on scleroderma. Seeing collaboration between labs is so refreshing because instead of seeing a highly competitive and self-contained atmosphere, my experience has been full of data sharing and collaborative efforts in order to come up with solutions.  He even said I could visit his clinic and shadow him, which is an amazing opportunity that I’m excited for.

The ...

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blauer
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